Research

iMinds – MMLab – Ghent University wins Best Demo Award at ISWC2014


For the third year in a row, iMindsMMLab – Ghent University won the prestigious Best Demo Award on the International Semantic Web Conference 2014 held in Trentino, Italy. The team showcased lightweight Linked Data running on a Raspberry Pi microcomputer, which allows clients to execute complex queries easily, while minimizing server processing.

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60+ demos make digital innovation tangible at iMinds The Conference

On October 23rd, the market-oriented demo floor of iMinds The Conference will illustrate the numerous ways in which digital innovation can positively impact economy and society. This year, the exhibition area will be bigger than ever, boasting 60+ booths. Exploring the many iMinds research projects and iMinds affiliated start-ups will offer you a glimpse of how these tangible applications, products and services are taking shape for the digital future.

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Ghent University is looking for a Scientific collaborator

UGent - logoParasitic worm infections are an important constraint on livestock productivity worldwide. While these infections have a wide distribution, the extent of their occurrence is largely driven by climatic and environmental conditions. The aim of the position is to be the principal responsible for the analysis of a longitudinal dataset where 2 worm infections in cattle were monitored over a 7-year period, to describe potential time trends, assess correlations between the 2 infections and relate these trends and correlations to meteorological and environmental variables. You will make part of a multidisciplinary team involving parasitologists and epidemiologists with extensive experience in data-analysis.

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Keeping the gut barrier intact – The thin line between cell survival and cell death

VIB - LogoResearchers at VIB and Ghent University have unraveled the crucial role of a protein (RIPK1) in keeping the gut epithelium intact. The epithelium of the gut plays a critical role in the human body as it allows absorption of nutrients and functions as a barrier to protect our body from intestinal bacteria.

Keeping of this epithelium intact therefore requires tight control, which is ensured by a subtle balance between cell renewal, cell survival and cell death. RIPK1 is a protein that fulfills a dual role as regulator of cell death and cell survival. In many pathological conditions, the pro-death function of RIPK1 is predominant.

Nozomi Takahashi and Peter Vandenabeele (VIB/UGent) found that , under normal conditions, RIPK1 is essential to protect gut epithelial cells from excessive cell death, and thereby ensures the barrier function of this organ from bacterial infiltration. Targeting RIPK1’s functions may therefore open new doors for the therapeutic control of diseases that are characterized by gut inflammation and local barrier loss, such as Crohn’s disease.

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